The Team

The EHN team is made of contributors who volunteered to serve in these capacities. 

Review Editor

Alyssa Kreikemeier

Content Editor

Anastasia Day

Content Editor

Anna Guasco

Review Editor

Asmae Ourkiya

Assistant Executive Editor

Diana M. Valencia

Executive Editor / Founder

Elizabeth Hameeteman

Review Editor / Series Editor for Politics of Nature

Emily Webster

Outreach Coordinator and Podcast Co-Host

Emma C. Moesswilde

Content Editor

Evelyn Ramiel

Content Editor

Genie Yoo

Content Editor

Lívia Regina Batista

Community Coordinator

Lindsay E. Marshall

Podcast Co-Host

Natalie R. Wilkinson

Content Editor

Natascha Otoya

Assistant Executive Editor / Series Editor for Tools for Change

Ramya Swayamprakash

Content Editor

Trang Dang

Review Editor

Alyssa Kreikemeier

Alyssa Kreikemeier (she/her) is a review editor for EHN. Prior to beginning her doctoral study in American Studies at Boston University, she worked in educational programming, research, and non-profit environments. Alyssa also holds an Ed.M. with concentrations in engaged research and intercultural exchange from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her current research explores the historical development of air in the North American West, drawing upon cultural landscape studies, public history, and Native American and Indigenous Studies.

Content Editor

Anastasia Day

Anastasia Day (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She’s a doctoral candidate in History and Hagley Scholar in Capitalism, Technology, and Culture at the University of Delaware. Anastasia identifies as a historian of environment, technology, business, and society, themes that collide uniquely in food. Her dissertation is entitled “Productive Plots: Nature, Nation, and Industry in the Victory Gardens of the U.S. World War II Home Front.”

Content Editor

Anna Guasco

Anna Guasco (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She’s a PhD candidate and Gates Cambridge Scholar in the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge. Her doctoral work focuses on histories, narratives, and environmental justice issues surrounding the migration and conservation of gray whales along the North American Pacific Coast. She holds a BA in American Studies from Carleton College and an MSc in Environment, Culture and Society from the University of Edinburgh, and her prior professional work includes working as a national park ranger in California. 

Review Editor

Asmae Ourkiya

Asmae Ourkiya (they/them) is a review editor for EHN. They are a Moroccan environmentalist and human rights activist residing in Cork, Ireland. After securing a Masters degree in Green Cultural Studies, Asmae is currently a PhD candidate and a research and teaching assistant at Mary Immaculate College at the the University of Limerick, Ireland. Their main research interests are queer ecofeminism, social justice, environmental justice, climate change, minority rights, and human rights. Asmae’s dissertation focuses on expanding queer intersectional ecofeminism. With the aim of disseminating their research findings, they are also a freelance journalist who contributed to a number of magazines and online platforms such as RTÉ Brainstorm and The Green News Ireland. They have also been active internationally to support different causes revolving around but not limited to climate justice, minority rights, women’s rights, and LGBTQ rights.

Assistant Executive Editor

Diana M. Valencia

Dr. Diana M. Valencia (she/ella) is an assistant executive editor for EHN. She recentely received her PhD in History at the University of Exeter. Her research focused on food security and food sovereignty in the Colombian peasant landscape, reviewing impacts on food culture and agroecosystems resulting from the practical resolution of Agrarian Reforms and counter-reforms. A Colombian herself, Diana is a multidisciplinary investigation, combining rural studies and food security theory with environmental history methods, aiming for practical impact and to inform food production debates. She makes the case for communities and their territories by giving voice to the peasantry as subject and agents of their own history.

Executive Editor / Founder

Elizabeth Hameeteman

Dr. Elizabeth Hameeteman (she/her) is the executive editor of EHN, and created this platform in 2018. She recentely obtained her PhD in History at Boston University. Her dissertation, titled “Pipe Parity: Desalination, Development, and the Global Quest for Water in the 1950s and 1960s,” explored the role of desalination as a seemingly viable adaptation strategy to reduce the impact of water scarcity and climate variability in the post-WWII period. Originally from the Netherlands and now based in Berlin, Elizabeth has a background in Law and American Studies.

Review Editor / Series Editor for Politics of Nature

Emily Webster

Emily Webster (she/her) is a review editor for EHN, and the editor of our Politics of Nature series. She’s a PhD Candidate in Environmental History at the University of Chicago, and her work focuses on the relationship between environment and disease in the 19th century British Empire, and intersects with the history of science and medicine; public health and disease; land use change, ecology, and climate change; and the Anthropocene. Emily is currently completing her Masters thesis in Public Health Science and her dissertation project, entitled “Diseased Landscapes: Land Use Change and Emerging Epidemics in the British Empire, 1837-1914.”

Outreach Coordinator and Podcast Co-Host

Emma C. Moesswilde

Emma C. Moesswilde (she/her) is EHN’s outreach coordinator and co-host of Ecotones Now, EHN’s companion podcast. She’s a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Georgetown University. Her dissertation project investigates the relationships between climate change and agricultural practice by examining rural experiences of and adaptations to seasonal variability across the British Northern Atlantic from 1540-1816. Emma is committed to incorporating multidisciplinary methods and evidence to understand how rural communities responded and adapted to climate change over the course of the early modern period.

Born and raised in midcoast Maine, Emma has lived and worked in rural communities and environments for much of her life, including projects with Maine Farmland Trust and Maine Conservation Voters. She earned a B.A. cum laude in History and Environmental Studies from Bowdoin College in 2018, and an M.A. in History from Georgetown in 2021. Her scholarly work has contributed to publications such as Nature and H-Environment and been featured in Active History and NiCHE. Emma also co-hosts the podcast Climate History. She lives in Washington, D.C., where she can often be found looking for dinner ingredients at the farmers’ market or exploring parks with her dog, Mouse.

Content Editor

Evelyn Ramiel

Evelyn Ramiel (xey/xeir) is a content editor for EHN. After completing an MA at York University about human-microbe relations on Japanese warships, xey are writing a dissertation on the ecological and animal history of Japanese character merchandise, also at York University. On xeir off days, xey create and publish personal zines that range from collage picture books to surrealist visual essays about digital dolphins. Through both the dissertation and personal projects, Evelyn argues that media studies and history need to get weirder and more compassionate if scholars want to reach our readers and students in traumatic times. 

Content Editor

Genie Yoo

Genie Yoo (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She’s a PhD candidate in History at Princeton University, at trained in the early modern and modern history of Southeast Asia and works at the intersection of history of science, medicine, religion, and environmental history. 

Content Editor

Lívia Regina Batista

Dr. Lívia Regina Batista (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She earned a PhD in Environmental Law at Universidade de São Paulo (USP), and her research interests include the intersection between environmental issues and intellectual property rights, climate change, international transfer of climate-related technologies, and environmental racism. Lívia currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Exeter, Penryn Campus.

Community Coordinator

Lindsay E. Marshall

Dr. Lindsay E. Marshall (she/her) is EHN’s community ccordinator. She’s a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and holds a PhD in History from the University of Oklahoma and an MA in Liberal Arts from Stanford University. Lindsay studies the connection between public memory, K-12 education, Native history, and the history of the horse in the American West. Lindsay’s scholarship seeks to re-center Native people and Native history in North America’s historical narratives and public memory. She also serves as social media director for Natsu Puuku, a program dedicated to preserving wild horses and teaching Comanche horsemanship in Oklahoma.

Podcast Co-Host

Natalie R. Wilkinson

Natalie R. Wilkinson (she/her) is co-host of Ecotones Now, EHN’s companion podcast. She recently received her MA student in History at the University of Oklahoma. Prior to OU, she studied Film at the San Francisco Art Institute. Natalie’s research interests lie in history of ecology and resource management.

Content Editor

Natascha Otoya

Natascha Otoya (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She joined the History PhD program at Georgetown University in 2017. Her research focuses on the development of the oil industry in Brazil in the first half of the twentieth century. Natascha is particularly interested in human/nature interactions and how different groups, like politicians and scientists, viewed such interactions. Additionally, her research interests overlap with the field of history of science, as geology is a central element in the search and exploration of petroleum in Brazil, and she hopes to further develop collaborations with this branch of the natural sciences. Before coming to Georgetown, Natascha completed a Master’s degree in Social History at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Brazil. Non-academic interests include cycling, swimming in the ocean, and a new-found love for yoga. 

Assistant Executive Editor / Series Editor for Tools for Change

Ramya Swayamprakash

Dr. Ramya Swayamprakash (she/her/Amma) is an assistant executive editor for EHN and also the editor of our Tools for Change series. She’s an Assistant Professor in Integrative, Religious, and Intercultural Studies at the Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI. A transnational and interdisciplinary environmental scholar who doctoral work focused on rivers, dredging, and the place of nature in the Great Lakes, Ramya’s research has been published in academic and public-facing avenues. She takes tea and dredging (not necessarily in that order) seriously. In addition to her work on the Great Lakes, Ramya is now going back to her earlier interest in dams in post colonial India. As a survivor of domestic abuse and as a single parent, Ramya’s scholarship is driven by a commitment to social/ecological justice and equity.

Picture credit: Gary Caldwell Productions for @eastlansinginfo.

Content Editor

Trang Dang

Trang Dang (she/her) is a content editor for EHN. She’s a PhD student at Nottingham Trent University, and has a BA and an MA in English Literature from Oxford Brookes University. Her project focuses on Jeff VanderMeer’s weird fiction, exploring narratives of co-existence between humans and nonhumans and the role of new weird novels in portraying the current climate crisis. Trang’s main research interests are contemporary literature, cli/sci-fi, critical theory, and continental philosophy. She has published on the topics of animal studies, American culture and politics, and contemporary critical theory concerning the Anthropocene. 

Former Team Members

Former Series Editor for Tools for Change

Nicole Welk-Joerger

Former Content Editor

Shelby Brewster

Former Series Editor for Tools for Change

Nicole Welk-Joerger

Dr. Nicole Welk-Joerger (she/her) is the former editor of our Tools for Change series. Currently a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at North Carolina State University, she is interested in how capitalist ideals have transformed human and nonhuman bodies. Nicole’s first book will focus on U.S. preoccupations with bovine bodies and the long history of American attempts to mold them into symbols of health and sustainability.

Former Content Editor

Shelby Brewster

Dr. Shelby Brewster (she/her) is a former content editor for EHN. She obtained a PhD in History from the University of Pittsburgh in May 2021. Her dissertation, titled “Planetary Praxes: Performing Humanity Under Ecological Emergency,” explored the multiplicity of ways the relationship between the human and nonhuman is performed in light of ecological emergency. Shelby’s work has been published in The Journal of American Drama and TheatreFoundation: The International Journal of Science Fiction, and Theatre Journal.